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20121101
20121130
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MSNBCW 17
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
-fire, these talks taking place in cairo have told nbc news they are serious, that they are making progress and that this is how the negotiations stand right at this moment. the israelis want a two-part deal, a two-stage deal. the first part would be an immediate hostility, immediate cessation of violence, both sides stop attacking each other. that would be unconditional. then israel would want to move to a second stage where the two sides, israel and the palestinians, would engage in this discussions, negotiations overs the next two weeks to one month talking about potentially ending the siege on gaza, making it easier for palestinians -- >> and clearly we're having difficulty with richard's reporting. surmounts any difficult of technology. richard is reporting on negotiations in cairo -- amman, you're in gaza as well. negotiations would be a immediate cessation of hostilities and a two-stage process within two weeks to a month there would be a broader agreement. we've known from the start that israel wants to do something about changing the reality where these rocket attacks do not contin
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
. >> nbc's stephanie gosk is in tel aviv, ayman mohyeldin in gaza, jim maceda in cairo. let's ask jim maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demand
. >>> egypt is poised for more demonstrations in cairo tomorrow over a new constitutional crisis. president muhammed morsi's challenge to the judiciary involving holdovers from the mubarak regime and raulong traditions. joining me is ambassador dennis ross. thank you so much. good to see you. >> you too. >> egypt. now, perhaps morsi felt empowered by his role as a peacemaker on gaza, but he ran right into long-standing traditions. >> he did. he did. i think bear in mind a couple of things. number one, he felt that the role he played made him a central figure in the region as a whole. in mubarak's last few years, the fact was mubarak was increasingly on the sidelines, not playing a major role in the middle east. here's president morsi thinking he can play on the image they are a leader in the region and he can use that as a device to make a move internally. he made that move but i think it's a clear miscalculation because he took on the independents of the judiciary. it doesn't matter that. these were leaders who were holdovers from the mubarak regime, they still represented a symbol of inde
in cairo. >> now sparking a war of words with the president, senators are threatening to block her potential nom nation as secretary of state. >> the reason i don't trust her is because i think she knew better, and if she didn't know better, she shouldn't be the voice of america. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should have after me. >> we'll talk to senator lindsey graham exclusively this morning. >>> plus, the key figures trying to get to the bottom of benghazi and the petraeus affair. chair of the senate intelligence committee senator dianne feinstein of california. and chair of the house intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers of michigan. >>> then after the election, will washington get anything done? talks start on how to avoid the fiscal cliff, as mitt romney draws fire from fellow republicans by accusing the president of doling out, quote, gifts to minority groups in exchange for their vote. what's the fallout and the future of the gop? with us, tea-party backed congressman raul labrador, tom friedman, former white hous
. they clashed with police again in the streets of cairo. the protests began last week after morsi issued a decree last thursday giving himself near absolute power. nbc's jim maceda joins us live from cairo and may be movement of new constitution? >> reporter: right. well, you have got this whole -- this is really basically a constitutional crisis from the beginning. you know, tamron pitting morsi against the judiciary so we're going to see it playing out in the courts and the streets but what happened today was that egypt's highest appeals court known as the court of casation said to suspend the work and effectively going on strike. but and it would stay on strike it's saying until morsi cancels his controversial decree giving as you say absolute power, almost absolute power. now that court joined by a number of lower appeals courts today, as well. and the level of criticism from the judges, tamron, really unprecedented. they said that morsi's decree, quote, defies belief. many other judges and lawyers and journalists have now got on didn't bandwagon and striking. so far, morsi is defian
in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a very important role in this. it can exert a tremendous amount of leverage on the israelis to avoid a ground invasion of the gaza strip. while the u.s. does believe that israel has a right too defend its
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
that suggest that the video was the genesis of it. i know what was happening in cairo, they were concerned about that. but what is crystal clear is that immediately, they knew because they said they testified in the hearing we had before the election, that there they were witnessing this in real time and all of those indications were that this was a very orchestrated, very sophisticated attack on the compound that went on for hours and hours and hours. this was not a mob gone wild. there was not a video sparking this spontaneously. >> congressman, you've had your own hearings with darrell issa and there have been complaints from the democratic ranking members that they were not involved in either the witness lists or the briefings by the witnesses or questioning leading into it. what do you think of senator mccain and senator graham who are calling for a select committee which would be perhaps a joint committee, house and senate, bipartisan, to have one group like a watergate panel or an iran-contra panel to look into benghazi? >> the first part of your question i would beg to differ. the
was certainly in sky r cairo and tunisia and other places. is this partly a victim of what's happened for the arab spring, the impetus for change has moved on? >> i don't think it necessarily has to do with the arab spring really. to be honest with you, what's been lacking is courage of leadership. we've seen in the international level, international diplomatic level, large agreements on what needs to be done to move this situation forward except for the united states which has played unfortunately a very obstructive role in international forums, objecting to, you know, preventing israeli settlement expansion when it comes to moving, you know, the negotiations forward and so on. so, you know, we need to could some soul searching here in washington to -- about what role we can play. the first and most important thing i think we can do is tell both sides, particularly now the israelis who we have connections with, that this needs to stop immediately. >> but finally how can you get the hamas to guarantee that the rockets will stop firing towards jerusalem and tel aviv? >> if you look at
in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good new
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)